Meet US Presidents Who Smoked Marijuana in the White House

US Presidents Who Smoked Marijuana
US Presidents Who Smoked Marijuana
Meet US Presidents Who Smoked Marijuana in the White House
Meet US Presidents Who Smoked Marijuana in the White House
While we’re really sure about the last three presidents’ history of pot smoking, the historical record is unclear about some of the rest.
Here are all our presidents but some of them are includet on our list.

US Presidents in history:

1. George Washington
2. John Adams

19th Century

3. Thomas Jefferson
4. James Madison
5. James Monroe
6. John Quincy Adams
7. Andrew Jackson
8. Martin Van Buren
9. William Henry Harrison
10. John Tyler
11. James K. Polk
12. Zachary Taylor
13. Millard Fillmore
14. Franklin Pierce
15. James Buchanan
16. Abraham Lincoln
17. Andrew Johnson
18. Ulysses S. Grant
19. Rutherford B. Hayes
20. James Garfield
21. Chester A. Arthur
22. Grover Cleveland
23. Benjamin Harrison
24. Grover Cleveland
25. William McKinley

20th Century

26. Theodore Roosevelt
27. William Howard Taft
28. Woodrow Wilson
29. Warren G. Harding
30. Calvin Coolidge
31. Herbert Hoover
32. Franklin D. Roosevelt
33. Harry S. Truman
34. Dwight D. Eisenhower
35. John F. Kennedy
36. Lyndon B. Johnson
37. Richard M. Nixon
38. Gerald R. Ford
39. James Carter
40. Ronald Reagan
41. George H. W. Bush
42. William J. Clinton

21st Century

43. George W. Bush
44. Barack Obama

Here’s a look at the tokers and anti-tokers in the White House.

US Presidents Who Smoked Marijuana

Barack Obama

Barack Obama is the 44th President of the United States.
Barack Obama is the 44th President of the United States. His story is the American story — values from the heartland, a middle-class upbringing in a strong family, hard work and education as the means of getting ahead, and the conviction that a life so blessed should be lived in service to others. Us Presidents.

The current president wrote about his cocaine and marijuana use as a youth in Hawaii and famously said, “When I was a kid, I inhaled, frequently. That was the point,” when running for president in 2008.

George W. Bush

George W. Bush, America's 43rd President (2001-2009)
George W. Bush, America’s 43rd President (2001-2009) was transformed into a wartime President in the aftermath of the airborne terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, facing the “greatest challenge of any President since Abraham Lincoln.” Us Presidents.

Dubya was known as a cocaine user in his younger days, but he would never respond to questions about his marijuana use. Later, he told his biographer, Douglas Wead (yes, pronounced like “weed”), “I wouldn’t answer the marijuana questions. You know why? Because I don’t want some little kid doing what I tried.”

Bill Clinton

Bill Clinton is an American politician from Arkansas who served as the 42nd President of the United States (1993-2001)
Bill Clinton is an American politician from Arkansas who served as the 42nd President of the United States (1993-2001). He took office at the end of the Cold War, and was the first baby-boomer generation President. Us Presidents.

Slick Willie famously said, “When I was in England, I experimented with marijuana a time or two, and I didn’t like it. I didn’t inhale and never tried it again,” when asked about his marijuana use. In true Clintonian fashion, he may have been telling the truth. The late Christopher Hitchens, who attended Oxford with Clinton, said Bill had an affinity for pot brownies, so he may not have ever tried “it” (inhaling) ever again.

John F. Kennedy

John F. Kennedy was the 35th President of the United States (1961-1963), the youngest man elected to the office
John F. Kennedy was the 35th President of the United States (1961-1963), the youngest man elected to the office. On November 22, 1963, when he was hardly past his first thousand days in office, JFK was assassinated in Dallas, Texas, becoming also the youngest President to die. Us Presidents.

JFK used marijuana to deal with severe back pain, according to a few written accounts, including “John F. Kennedy: A Biography”, which described this White House scene: “On the evening of July 16, 1962, according to [Washington Post executive] Jim Truitt, Kennedy and Mary Meyer smoked marijuana together. … The president smoked three of the six joints Mary brought to him. At first he felt no effects. Then he closed his eyes and refused a fourth joint. ‘Suppose the Russians did something now,’ he said.”

Franklin Pierce

Franklin Pierce became 14th President of the United States at a time of apparent tranquility (1853-1857)
Franklin Pierce became 14th President of the United States at a time of apparent tranquility (1853-1857). By pursuing the recommendations of southern advisers, Pierce — a New Englander — hoped to ease the divisions that led eventually to Civil War. Us Presidents.

One of three military men to become president who enjoyed smoking marijuana with the troops fighting the Mexican-American War.  In a letter to his family, Pierce wrote that marijuana smoking was “about the only good thing” about the war.

Zachary Taylor

Zachary Taylor, a general and national hero in the United States Army from the time of the Mexican-American War and the War of 1812, was elected the 12th U.S. President
Zachary Taylor, a general and national hero in the United States Army from the time of the Mexican-American War and the War of 1812, was elected the 12th U.S. President, serving from March 1849 until his death in July 1850. Us Presidents.

Another of the three military men who smoked marijuana with the troops.

Andrew Jackson

Andrew Jackson was the seventh President of the United States from 1829 to 1837, seeking to act as the direct representative of the common man
Andrew Jackson was the seventh President of the United States from 1829 to 1837, seeking to act as the direct representative of the common man. More nearly than any of his predecessors, Andrew Jackson was elected by popular vote; as President he sought to act as the direct representative of the common man. Us Presidents.

Third of the three military men whose letters referred to smoking marijuana with the troops.

James Monroe

James Monroe was the fifth President of the United States (1817–1825) and the last President from the Founding Fathers
James Monroe was the fifth President of the United States (1817–1825) and the last President from the Founding Fathers. On New Year’s Day, 1825, at the last of his annual White House receptions, President James Monroe made a pleasing impression upon a Virginia lady who shook his hand: “He is tall and well formed. His dress plain and in the old style…. His manner was quiet and dignified. From the frank, honest expression of his eye … I think he well deserves the encomium passed upon him by the great Jefferson, who said, ‘Monroe was so honest that if you turned his soul inside out there would not be a spot on it.’ Us Presidents.

Openly smoked hashish while he was Ambassador to France and continued smoking it until his death at age 73.

James Madison

James Madison, America's fourth President (1809-1817)
James Madison, America’s fourth President (1809-1817) , made a major contribution to the ratification of the Constitution by writing The Federalist Papers, along with Alexander Hamilton and John Jay. In later years, he was referred to as the “Father of the Constitution.” Us Presidents.

The “Father of the Constitution” claimed that hemp gave him the insight to create a new democratic nation.

Thomas Jefferson

Thomas Jefferson, a spokesman for democracy, was an American Founding Father
Thomas Jefferson, a spokesman for democracy, was an American Founding Father, the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and the third President of the United States (1801–1809). Us Presidents.

In addition to farming hemp, Jefferson was Ambassador to France during the hashish era there.  At risk of imprisonment if caught, Jefferson smuggled hemp seeds from China known for their potency to America.  However, as far as our research takes us, he never said or wrote, “Some of my finest hours have been spent sitting on my back veranda, smoking hemp and observing as far as my eye can see.”

George Washington

On April 30, 1789, George Washington, standing on the balcony of Federal Hall on Wall Street in New York, took his oath of office as the first President of the United States
On April 30, 1789, George Washington, standing on the balcony of Federal Hall on Wall Street in New York, took his oath of office as the first President of the United States. On April 30, 1789, George Washington, standing on the balcony of Federal Hall on Wall Street in New York, took his oath of office as the first President of the United States. “As the first of every thing, in our situation will serve to establish a Precedent,” he wrote James Madison, “it is devoutly wished on my part, that these precedents may be fixed on true principles.” Born in 1732 into a Virginia planter family, he learned the morals, manners, and body of knowledge requisite for an 18th century Virginia gentleman. – Us Presidents.

The father of our country kept meticulous diaries, wherein he noted “Sowed hemp at muddy hole by swamp” away from the hemp he grew for fiber. “Began to separate the male from female plants at do [sic –rather too late” and “Pulling up the (male) hemp. Was too late for the blossom hemp by three weeks or a month” indicates he was going for female plants with higher THC content. There is also indication he used hemp preparations to deal with his toothaches.