Unimaginable radiation levels inside Fukushima’s crippled nuclear power station

Unimaginable radiation levels inside Fukushima's crippled nuclear power station. According to the institute, just 4 sieverts of radiation exposure would be enough kill a handful of people. Tepco said it had found a two-metre hole in the metal grating under the reactor that would need to be patched after a robot was sent in to asses some of the damage.
Unimaginable radiation levels inside Fukushima's crippled nuclear power station. According to the institute, just 4 sieverts of radiation exposure would be enough kill a handful of people. Tepco said it had found a two-metre hole in the metal grating under the reactor that would need to be patched after a robot was sent in to asses some of the damage.

Radiation levels recorded inside Fukushima’s crippled nuclear power station are at the highest levels since its catastrophic meltdown in 2011.

Tokyo Electric Power Co. Holdings Inc (Tepco) said the radiation level in the containment vessel of Reactor 2 in the Fukushima No 1 power plant had reached a maximum of 530 sieverts per hour, Japan Times reports.

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The “unimaginable” radiation levels were assessed by the National Institute of Radiological Sciences.

According to the institute, just 4 sieverts of radiation exposure would be enough kill a handful of people. Tepco said it had found a two-metre hole in the metal grating under the reactor that would need to be patched after a robot was sent in to asses some of the damage.

The hole which appears to be warped is believed to have formed from searing hot fuel escaping the pressure chamber during the accident.

Early next month a new specially designed robot will be sent inside the reactor to start a detailed assessment of various damaged systems, however it will only be able to operate for a few hours before it is destroyed by the extreme levels of radiation inside the plant.

The 2011 meltdown was the worst nuclear accident since the Chernobyl disaster in 1986 Tepco, the company responsible for clean-up after 2011 Fukushima disaster, found high levels of radiation inside one of the crippled reactors, but no reactor is about to collapse into the ocean.

While the 530 sieverts is extraordinarily high, experts don’t expect it to be the highest. “Similar remote investigations are being planned for Daiichi Units 1 and 3. We should not be surprised if even higher radiation levels are found there, but only actual measurements will tell.”

The decommissioning project is a long-term thing. Expected to take up to 40 years, it’s a big, complicated, and dangerous job. Estimates by the Japanese government put the cost upwards of $190 billion dollars.

Because so much nuclear material from Fukushima escaped into the Pacific Ocean, there are many scientists that believe that it was the worst environmental disaster in human history, but most people in the general population seem to think that since the mainstream media really doesn’t talk about it anymore that everything must be under control. Unfortunately, that is not true at all.

In fact, PBS reported just last year that “it is incorrect to say that Fukushima is under control when levels of radioactivity in the ocean indicate ongoing leaks“. And now we have just learned that the radiation level inside reactor 2 is so high that no human could possibly survive being exposed to it.

According to the Japan Times, the level of radiation inside the containment vessel of reactor 2 is now estimated to be “530 sieverts per hour”… A lot of people that end up dying as a result of this crisis may never even know that it was Fukushima that caused their deaths.

Personally, I am convinced that this is the greatest environmental crisis that humanity has ever experienced, and if the latest reading from reactor 2 is any indication, things just took a very serious turn for the worse.

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The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster was an energy accident at the Fukushima I Nuclear Power Plant in Fukushima, initiated primarily by the tsunami following the Tōhoku earthquake on 11 March 2011. Immediately after the earthquake, the active reactors automatically shut down their sustained fission reactions. However, the tsunami destroyed the emergency generators that would have provided power to cool the reactors. The insufficient cooling led to three nuclear meltdowns, hydrogen-airchemical explosions, and the release of radioactive material in Units 1, 2 and 3 from 12 March to 15 March. Loss of cooling also caused the pool for storing spent fuel from Reactor 4 to overheat on 15 March due to the decay heat from the fuel rods.

On 5 July 2012, the Fukushima Nuclear Accident Independent Investigation Commission (NAIIC) found that the causes of the accident had been foreseeable, and that the plant operator, Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO), had failed to meet basic safety requirements such as risk assessment, preparing for containing collateral damage, and developing evacuation plans. On 12 October 2012, TEPCO admitted for the first time that it had failed to take necessary measures for fear of inviting lawsuits or protests against its nuclear plants.

The Fukushima disaster is the largest nuclear disaster since the 1986 Chernobyl disaster and the second disaster to be given the Level 7 event classification of the International Nuclear Event Scale. Though there have been no fatalities linked to radiation due to the accident, the eventual number of cancer deaths, according to the linear no-threshold theory of radiation safety, that will be caused by the accident is expected to be around 130–640 people in the years and decades ahead. The United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation and World Health Organization report that there will be no increase in miscarriages, stillbirths or physical and mental disorders in babies born after the accident. However, an estimated 1,600 deaths are believed to have occurred due to the resultant evacuation conditions. There are no clear plans for decommissioning the plant, but the plant management estimate is 30 or 40 years. A frozen soil barrier has been constructed in an attempt to prevent further contamination of seeping groundwater by melted-down nuclear fuel , but in July 2016 TEPCO revealed that the ice wall had failed to stop groundwater from flowing in and mixing with highly radioactive water inside the wrecked reactor buildings, adding that they are “technically incapable of blocking off groundwater with the frozen wall”

In February 2017, TEPCO released images taken inside reactor 2 by a remote-controlled camera, that show there is a 2-meter hole in the metal grating under the pressure vessel in the reactor’s primary containment vessel, which was caused by the fuel escaping the pressure vessel in a Nuclear meltdown. Radiation levels of about 650 sieverts per hour have been detected in the containment vessel of reactor No. 2.

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