Study shows links with daily alcohol drinking-risk of breast cancer

According to a new report by the World Cancer Research Fund and the American Institute for Cancer Research, a daily glass of your favorite alcoholic beverage might increase the risk of breast cancer.

An average of 10 grams of alcohol a day is associated with a 5 percent risk increase of breast cancer in pre-menopausal women and 9 percent in post-menopausal women, according to the report published online Tuesday.

Researchers analyzed 119 observational studies on breast cancer risk from around the world, which included 12 million women and more than 260,000 cases of breast cancer.

The report also revealed, for the first time, that vigorous exercise such as running or fast bicycling decreases the risk of both pre- and post-menopausal breast cancers.

The new report also analyzes previous studies on associations between breast cancer risk and overall diet, nutrition, physical activity and weight.

It finds that greater weight gain or body fatness in adulthood, for instance, increases the risk of postmenopausal breast cancer.

It also points out that mothers who breastfeed are at lower risk for breast cancer.

“With this comprehensive and up-to-date report, the evidence is clear: having a physically active lifestyle, maintaining a healthy weight throughout life and limiting alcohol – these are all steps women can take to lower their risk,” said Dr. Anne McTiernan, a lead author of the report and cancer prevention expert at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.

Globally, breast cancer is the top cancer form in women, according to the World Health Organization.

Breast cancer can occur in men, rare though, accounting for less than 1 percent of cancer incidences and mortality among men in the United States, a separate report released earlier has shown.