Black Holes, Dark Matter, and Gravitational Waves connected to a new mind-blowing theory

The past few years have been incredible for physics discoveries. Scientists spotted the Higgs boson, a particle they’d been hunting for almost 50 years, in 2012, and gravitational waves, which were theorized 100 years ago, in 2016.

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This year, they’re slated to take a picture of a black hole. So, thought some theorists, why not combine all of the craziest physics ideas into one, a physics turducken? What if we, say, try to spot the dark matter radiating off of black holes through their gravitational waves?

It’s really not that strange of an idea. Now that scientists have detected gravitational waves, ripples in spacetime spawned by the most violent physical events, they want to use their discovery to make real physics observations. They think they have a way to spot all-new particles that might make up dark matter, an unknown substance that accounts for over 80 percent of all of the gravity in the universe.

“The basic idea is that we’re trying to use black holes… the densest, most compact objects in the universe, to search for new kinds of particles,” Masha Baryakhtar, postdoctoral researcher at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Canada, told Gizmodo. Especially one particle: “The axion. People have been looking for it for 40 years.”

Black holes are the universe’s sinkholes, so strong that light can’t escape their pull once it’s entered. They’ve got such powerful gravitational fields that they produce gravitational waves when they collide with each other. Dark matter might not be made from particles (specks of mass and energy), but if it was, we might observe it as axions, particles around one quintillion (a billion billion) times lighter than an electron, hanging around black holes. Now that you understand all the terms, here’s how the theory works.

Baryakhtar and her teammates think that black holes are more than just bear traps for light, but nuclei at the center of a sort of gravitational atom. The axions would be the electrons, so to speak. If you already know about black holes, you know they have incredibly hot, high-energy discs of gas orbiting them, produced by the friction between particles accelerated by the black hole’s gravity. This theory ignores that stuff, since axions wouldn’t interact via friction.

Keeping with the atom analogy, the axions can jump around the black hole, gaining and losing energy the same way that electrons do. But electrons interact via electromagnetism, so they let out electromagnetic waves, or light waves. Axions interact via gravity, so they let out gravitational waves. But like I said earlier, axions are tiny. Unlike a tiny atom, the black hole in these “gravity atoms” rotates, supercharging the space around it and coaxing it into producing more axions. Despite the axion’s tiny mass, this so-called superradiance process could generate 10^80 axions, the same number of atoms in the entire universe, around a single black hole. Are you still with me? Crazy spinning blob makes lots of crazy stuff.

Craziest of all, we should be able to hear a gravitational wave hum from these axions moving around and releasing gravitational waves in our detectors, similar to the way you see spectral lines coming off of electrons in atoms in chemistry class. “You’d see this at a particular frequency which would be roughly twice the axion mass,” said Baryakhtar.

There are giant gravitational wave detectors scattered around the world; presently there’s one called LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory) in Washington State, another LIGO in Louisiana, and one called Virgo in Italy that are sensitive enough to detect gravitational waves, and with upgrades, to detect axions and prove their theory right. Scientists would essentially need to record data, play it back, and tune their analysis like a radio to pick up the signal at just the right frequency.

There are other ways the team thinks it could spot this superradiance effect, by measuring the spins in sets of colliding black holes. If black holes really do produce axions, scientists would see very few quickly-spinning black holes in collisions, since the superradiance effects would slow down some of the colliding black holes and create a visible effect in the data, according to the research published this month in the journal Physical Review D. The black hole spins would have a specific pattern which we should be able to spot in the gravitational wave detector data.

Other scientists were immediately excited about this paper. “I’m always super excited about new ways to detect my favorite pet particle, the axion! Also, SUPERRADIANCE!” Dr. Chanda Prescod-Weinstein, the University of Washington axion wrangler, told Gizmodo in an email. “It’s so cool, and I haven’t read a paper that talked about [superradiance] in years. So it was really fun to see superradiance and axions in one paper.”

There are a few drawbacks, as there are with any theory. These theorized black hole atoms would have to produce axions of a certain mass, but that mass isn’t an ideal one for the axion to be a dark matter particle, said Prescod-Weinstein. Plus, the second detection idea, the one that looks at the spin rate of colliding black holes, might not work. “They say [in the paper] that they don’t take into account the potential influence of another black hole” in the colliding pair, Dr. Lionel London, a research associate at Cardiff University School of Physics and Astronomy specializing in gravitational wave modeling, told Gizmodo. “If this does turn out to be a significant effect and they’re not including it, this could cast doubt on their results.” But there’s hope. “There’s good reason to believe the effect of a companion [black hole] won’t be large.”

When would we spot these kinds of events? As of now, the LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave detectors probably aren’t ready. “With the current sensitivity we’re on the edge” of detecting axions, said Baryakhtar. “But LIGO will continue improving their instruments and at design sensitivity we might be able to see as many as 1000s of these axion signals coming in,” she said. Thousands of hums from these black hole-atoms.

So, if you’ve gotten all the way to this point of the story and still don’t understand what’s going on, a recap: We’ve got these gravitational wave detectors that cost hundreds of millions of dollars each, that are good at spotting really crazy things going on in the universe. Theorists have come up with an interesting way to use them to solve one of the most important interstellar mysteries: What the heck is dark matter? As with most new ideas in theoretical physics, this is something cool to think about and isn’t ready for the big time… yet.

“I think that timescale is always a concern, but we’re just getting started with LIGO discoveries,” said Prescod-Weinstein. “So who knows what’s around the corner over the next 10 years.”

Dark matter is an unidentified type of matter distinct from dark energy, baryonic matter (ordinary matter), and neutrinos whose existence would explain a number of otherwise puzzling astronomical observations.

The name refers to the fact that it does not emit or interact with electromagnetic radiation, such as light, and is thus invisible to the entire electromagnetic spectrum.

Although dark matter has not been directly observed, its existence and properties are inferred from its gravitational effects such as the motions of visible matter, gravitational lensing, its influence on the universe’s large-scale structure, on galaxies, and its effects in the cosmic microwave background.

The standard model of cosmology indicates that the total mass–energy of the universe contains 4.9% ordinary matter, 26.8% dark matter and 68.3% dark energy.

Thus, dark matter constitutes 84.5%[note 1] of total mass, while dark energy plus dark matter constitute 95.1% of total mass–energy content.

The great majority of ordinary matter in the universe is also unseen, since visible stars and gas inside galaxies and clusters account for less than 10% of the ordinary matter contribution to the mass-energy density of the universe.

The most widely accepted hypothesis on the form for dark matter is that it is composed of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) that interact only through gravity and the weak force.

The dark matter hypothesis plays a central role in current modeling of cosmic structure formation and galaxy formation and evolution and on explanations of the anisotropies observed in the cosmic microwave background (CMB).

All these lines of evidence suggest that galaxies, galaxy clusters, and the universe as a whole contain far more matter than that which is observable via electromagnetic signals.

Many experiments to detect proposed dark matter particles through non-gravitational means are under way; however, no dark matter particle has been conclusively identified.

Although the existence of dark matter is generally accepted by most of the astronomical community, a minority of astronomers, motivated by the lack of conclusive identification of dark matter, argue for various modifications of the standard laws of general relativity, such as MOND, TeVeS, and conformal gravity that attempt to account for the observations without invoking additional matter.

A black hole is a region of spacetime exhibiting such strong gravitational effects that nothing—not even particles and electromagnetic radiation such as light—can escape from inside it.

The theory of general relativity predicts that a sufficiently compact mass can deform spacetime to form a black hole.

The boundary of the region from which no escape is possible is called the event horizon. Although the event horizon has an enormous effect on the fate and circumstances of an object crossing it, no locally detectable features appear to be observed.

In many ways a black hole acts like an ideal black body, as it reflects no light.

Moreover, quantum field theory in curved spacetime predicts that event horizons emit Hawking radiation, with the same spectrum as a black body of a temperature inversely proportional to its mass.

This temperature is on the order of billionths of a kelvin for black holes of stellar mass, making it essentially impossible to observe.

Objects whose gravitational fields are too strong for light to escape were first considered in the 18th century by John Michell and Pierre-Simon Laplace.

The first modern solution of general relativity that would characterize a black hole was found by Karl Schwarzschild in 1916, although its interpretation as a region of space from which nothing can escape was first published by David Finkelstein in 1958.

Black holes were long considered a mathematical curiosity; it was during the 1960s that theoretical work showed they were a generic prediction of general relativity.

The discovery of neutron stars sparked interest in gravitationally collapsed compact objects as a possible astrophysical reality.

Black holes of stellar mass are expected to form when very massive stars collapse at the end of their life cycle.

After a black hole has formed, it can continue to grow by absorbing mass from its surroundings. By absorbing other stars and merging with other black holes, supermassive black holes of millions of solar masses (M☉) may form.

There is general consensus that supermassive black holes exist in the centers of most galaxies.

Despite its invisible interior, the presence of a black hole can be inferred through its interaction with other matter and with electromagnetic radiation such as visible light.

Matter that falls onto a black hole can form an external accretion disk heated by friction, forming some of the brightest objects in the universe.

If there are other stars orbiting a black hole, their orbits can be used to determine the black hole’s mass and location. Such observations can be used to exclude possible alternatives such as neutron stars.

In this way, astronomers have identified numerous stellar black hole candidates in binary systems, and established that the radio source known as Sagittarius A*, at the core of our own Milky Way galaxy, contains a supermassive black hole of about 4.3 million solar masses.

On 11 February 2016, the LIGO collaboration announced the first observation of gravitational waves; because these waves were generated from a black hole merger it was the first ever direct detection of a binary black hole merger.

On 15 June 2016, a second detection of a gravitational wave event from colliding black holes was announced.

Gravitational waves are ripples in the curvature of spacetime that propagate as waves at the speed of light, generated in certain gravitational interactions that propagate outward from their source.

The possibility of gravitational waves was discussed in 1893 by Oliver Heaviside using the analogy between the inverse-square law in gravitation and electricity.

In 1905 Henri Poincaré first proposed gravitational waves (ondes gravifiques) emanating from a body and propagating at the speed of light as being required by the Lorentz transformations.

Predicted in 1916 by Albert Einstein on the basis of his theory of general relativity, gravitational waves transport energy as gravitational radiation, a form of radiant energy similar to electromagnetic radiation.

Gravitational waves cannot exist in the Newton’s law of universal gravitation, since it is predicated on the assumption that physical interactions propagate at infinite speed.

Gravitational-wave astronomy is an emerging branch of observational astronomy which aims to use gravitational waves to collect observational data about sources of detectable gravitational waves such as binary star systems composed of white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes; and events such as supernovae, and the formation of the early universe shortly after the Big Bang.

On February 11, 2016, the LIGO Scientific Collaboration and Virgo Collaboration teams announced that they had made the first observation of gravitational waves, originating from a pair of merging black holes using the Advanced LIGO detectors.

On June 15, 2016, a second detection of gravitational waves from coalescing black holes was announced.

Besides LIGO, many other gravitational-wave observatories (detectors) are under construction. 

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(Ryan F. Mandelbaum contributed to this report “Black Holes, Dark Matter, and Gravitational Waves connected to a new mind-blowing theory”, edited to fit the page, added additional materials including illustrations by Alad Von Dari via VOP)