5 Breathtaking Images Of Earth That You Probably Never Seen

Images Sources by Different Agencies - Prepared by VOP Today Staff.

Let’s face it, after all of our differences and problems, in the end, we are all but a giant ant farm, living on a gigantic rock that is floating in space together with other space rocks at incredible speeds, heading towards an unknown region in space.

BY NERTI U. QATJA@VOP_TODAY – SOURCE:

With all of what our species has achieved in the last couple of decades, we still cannot move away from planet Earth, our ‘eternal’ island in a gigantic sea called universe.

While we wonder what our purpose on this planet is, and try and answer the numerous enigmas of our existence, we have come to understand that we as a society have set too many imaginary boundaries that differentiate us, creating an unbalanced civilization that has completely forgotten that when seen from space, there are no boundaries on the planet, and everyone is equally small, no matter where they live, what they do for a living and what religion or country they belong to.

This is why it’s a perfect moment that on this Earth Day, we take a look at some of the most incredible images of our planet taken from Space, in hopes that they will help us understand that we are all equal, and have to take equal responsibility for Mother Earth.

See that  Pale Blue Dot? well, that is how small we are! This image is the first ever portrait of the Solar System. It was taken by the Voyager 1 on February 14, 1990 from 4 billion miles away. The image is the perfect example of just how small we are. The image you se here is in fact the result of 60 different frames stitched together.

See that Pale Blue Dot? well, that is how small we are!

This image is the first ever portrait of the Solar System. It was taken by the Voyager 1 on February 14, 1990 from 4 billion miles away. The image is the perfect example of just how small we are. The image you se here is in fact the result of 60 different frames stitched together.

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In this image you are looking at the incredible, majestic and breathtaking view of the Great Lakes as they are seen from aboard the International Space Station. This image was taken by expedition 42 Commander Barry Wilmore. The image displays a remarkable nighttime view of the Great Lakes and its surrounding area on December 7, 2014.

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Scandinavia at night, like you never seen it before. This image was taken by astronauts aboard the International Space Station  just before midnight under a full moon. Prominent features include a green aurora to the north (upper middle of the image), the blackness of the Baltic Sea (lower right), clouds (top right) and snow in Norway illuminated under a full moon. City lights clearly show the recognizable coastline of the Skagerrak and Kattegat seaway leading into the Baltic Sea that separates Denmark from its neighbors to the north. The largest light clusters on the seaway are the capital cities of Oslo and Copenhagen. Cities facing the Baltic are the Polish port of Gdañsk and the Swedish capital, Stockholm. Smaller cities in northern Germany reveal the Baltic coastline (lower right).

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The very first image of Earth from Deep Space.

The first ever image of Earth from deep space was snapped by Lunar Orbiter 1 on Aug. 23, 1966. Earth is seen rising above the moon. The robotic orbiter was part of a NASA effort to map the lunar surface before sending astronauts. Unlike today’s digital photography, images were made on film, which was developed automatically onboard.

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Greetings from Mars… Earthlings!

This is the first image of our planet made from the surface of another planet. This historic image was taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on March 8, 2004, an hour before sunrise, with the surface of Mars in the foreground. The contrast was doubled to make Earth easier to see.